• schooloffice67

Upper Elementary Students Propose Global Solutions at 2022 Montessori Model United Nations

The Montessori Model United Nations is an annual conference held in collaboration with the United Nations for Montessori students who come from around the world to act as delegates for a nation. Through role-playing, each student writes, presents, and debates issues facing the global community. They act as a citizen of their assigned country and fully develop an understanding of the country’s needs and social justice issues, helping them truly take on their delegate role.




Our student delegates have been working since September to prepare their positions for the conference. To honor their work and dedication, we recognize all 39 students who participated by sharing a short summary of their work:


  • Aditya P. represented Indonesia and addressed the Economic and Social Council on Leaving No One Behind. Aditya’s focused on ending discrimination on basis of gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, geographic location, and migratory status.


  • Afsheen K. represented Madagascar and the Food and Agriculture Administration in advocating for green jobs. Afsheen suggested Madagascar create more public jobs so that people can enter the workforce and earn more money to lift themselves out of poverty.


  • Anish D. represented Indonesia and presented Transparency and Confidence-building Measures in Outer Space Activities. Anish commended Indonesia for signing the Treaty of Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons and suggested prioritizing outer space debris collection.


  • Aman P. represented Algeria on Green Jobs as an Effective Framework for Sustainable Agriculture to the Food and Agriculture Organization. He highlighted prioritizing recycling, ending food waste, and composting. Aman also addressed supporting job fields like solar energy engineering, forestry, and environmental management.


  • Avi M. represented Rwanda and addressed the Protection of Global Climate for Present and Future Generations of Humankind to the Economic and Financial Committee. The presentation focused on the financial needs associated with protecting the climate and how the remainder of the world can prepare themselves for affordable and effective solutions to climate change.


  • Azariya G. represented Australia and presented on Addressing Climate Change and Other Environment-Related Matters in Fisheries and Aquaculture to the Food and Agriculture Organization. Her speech touched on growing more popular crops, increasing access to clean water, and widening public infrastructure.


  • Caeden S. represented Egypt and addressed Improving Youth Well-Being and Mental Health on the Social and Economic Committee. The presentation centered on the topic of war in the region and the toll civil unrest takes on youth in Egypt and around the world.


  • Camille S. represented Rwanda and proposed solutions for improving Adolescents' Mental Health to the Economic and Social Committee. Camille presented the idea of government-funded therapists and free mental healthcare for Rwanda’s adolescents.


  • Christos S. represented El Salvador and spoke about Quality Education on the Social, Humanitarian, and Cultural Committee. He pointed out the country’s poverty rate as a leading reason for the poor quality of education and highlighted tackling the relationship between poverty, violent crime, and education to increase access to academic success.


  • Eleanor T. represented Australia and spoke on the Protection of Global Climate for Present and Future Generations of Mankind to the Economic and Financial Committee. Her speech suggested controlling greenhouse gas emissions by reducing food waste and funding wind turbines to phase out the use of coal.



  • Elijah M. represented Algeria and presented on Transparency and Confidence Building Measures in Outer Space Activities to the Disarmament and International Security Committee. Elijah stressed the importance of increased infrastructure spending to bring more internet availability to the citizens of Algeria and promoted early space education programs for Algeria’s youth.


  • Gabrielle S. represented Egypt and presented on the Humanitarian Consequences of Nuclear Weapons to the Disarmament and International Security Committee. She stressed Egypt’s commitment to nonproliferation efforts and urged the committee to consider a proposal to create a Weapons of Mass Destruction Free Zone in the Middle East.


  • Jaanvi C. represented Algeria and addressed the Humanitarian Consequences of Nuclear Weapons to the Disarmament and International Security Committee. Jaanvi asserted that the only way to reduce the number of nuclear weapons is to eliminate the demand and urged the nations present to sign nuclear treaties.


  • Jackson L. represented Madagascar and presented on Global Action on Patient Safety to the World Health Organization. The presentation stressed the importance of accessible healthcare for all people and recommended increasing spending to continue medical technological advancement.


  • Jayant P. represented Indonesia on the Economic and Financial Committee and spoke about the Protection of Global Climate for Present and Future Generations of Humankind. Jayant discussed ways Indonesia and the rest of the world could preserve existing trees and natural habitats, focus on renewable energy, and consume fewer meat products.


  • Jiraiya A. represented Rwanda and addressed the Economic and Financial Committee about Ensuring Access to Affordable, Reliable, Sustainable, and Modern Energy for All. Jiraiya commended the fact that in 2017, the world added more solar capacity than coal, gas, and nuclear plants combined and implored the committee to continue its dedication to energy access.


  • Joel V. represented Madagascar regarding Ocean Acidification to the Food and Agriculture Administration. Joel identified increasing levels of microplastics as a global concern and addressed Madagascar’s 30-year drought as a marker of the dangers of climate change.


  • Kaelyn S. represented El Salvador and spoke on the Elimination of Racism, Racial Discrimintation, Xenophobia, and Related Intolerance to the Social, Humanitarian, and Cultural Committee. Kaelyn suggested expanding the anti-discrimination curriculum in schools and supported equal pay for equal work, family leave for new parents, and anti-discrimination laws to protect LGBTQ people.


  • Krisha S. represented Madagascar and addressed the Elimination of Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia, and Related Intolerance to the Social, Humanitarian, and Cultural Committee. She proposed main solutions: expand legal protections for marginalized groups, access to an inclusion curriculum, and fund support programs for those being discriminated against.


  • Kushi P. represented Indonesia on the Disarmament and International Security Committee and addressed Disarmament and Human Consequences. Kushi proposed a program to track, locate, and dispose of all nuclear weapons before the year 2030: “We can make a world free from the nuclear threat.”



  • Maddox B. represented Egypt and spoke on Sustainable and Green Jobs to the Food and Agriculture Organization. He recommended pay incentives for workers to enter more sustainable careers and asserted that the government will encourage young scientists and engineers to develop sustainable tools to help protect Egypt’s infrastructure and the surrounding environment.


  • Mia K. R. represented Rwanda and addressed Leaving No One Behind to the Economic Social Council. Mia highlighted Rwanda’s past and current efforts to provide equal access to land and livestock ownership and spoke of ways current programs could be made more equitable to the indigenous and marginalized populations of Rwanda.


  • Mia L. represented Algeria on the Economic and Social Council and spoke on Leaving No One Behind. The speech centered on increasing access to education, especially for Algeria’s orphans, and providing healthcare, food, and shelter for low-income families.


  • Michael B. represented El Salvador and addressed Global Action on Patient Safety to the World Health Organization. He highlighted El Salvador’s poor standing in global healthcare rankings and brought attention to the unfortunate occurrence of preventable medical mistakes.


  • Mira S. represented El Salvador to the World Health Organization on Public Health Emergencies, Preparedness, and Response. Mira requested that larger, wealthier countries consider donating to El Salvador’s public hospital system to improve patient care.


  • Neil G. represented Algeria on the Economic and Social Committee and gave a speech on Youth Mental Health and Well-Being. Neil asserted that the well-being of adolescents depends on if they have a healthy life, can finish their education, and are able to get a job. He suggested ways to make that more accessible to Algeria’s youth.


  • Rea R. represented Egypt and addressed Climate Change and Other Environment-related matters in Aquaculture and Fisheries to the Food and Agriculture Organization. Rea’s presentation highlighted ways Egyptians could reduce, reuse, and recycle, especially the materials that harm their fish and waterways most.


  • Rohil S. represented Australia in the Food and Agriculture Organization and addressed Green Jobs. Rohil spoke of the difficulties that low-income Australians face accessing high-paying, energy-efficient jobs. Before Australia can pivot to relying on green jobs, it needs to address its nation’s poverty rate.


  • Sasha B. represented Rwanda and presented on Climate Change and Disaster Displacement to the Economic and Financial Affairs Council. Her position outlined the need for the global community to come together and donate vital items refugees need like food, blankets, and clean water. She also addressed the need for climate policies to slow the effects of climate change that continue to cause displacement around the globe.


  • Sean K. represented Algeria and gave a speech on Addressing Climate Change and Other Environment-related Matters in Fisheries and Aquaculture to the Food and Agriculture Organization. Sean outlined how Algeria has taken clear steps to protect our world’s oceans and urged other Mediterranean countries to join the ​​General Fisheries Commission for the Mediterranean.



  • Sebastian R. represented Madagascar to the Social, Humanitarian, and Cultural Committee and addressed Literacy for Life. Sebastian asserted that Madagascar needs free schools that offer snacks, lunch, and books for both boys and girls throughout the nation.


  • Seher K. represented Indonesia and spoke about Ensuring Access to Affordable, Reliable, Sustainable, and Modern Energy for All to The Economic and Financial Affairs Council. Seher advised other countries on the council to invest in renewable energy resources, prioritize energy-efficient practices, and adopt clean energy technologies and infrastructure, especially hydropower.


  • Shakti A. represented Australia on The Economic and Financial Affairs Council and addressed Modern, Renewable Energy for All. Shakti acknowledged that the best option is expanding renewable energy, but also stated that it is a costly option, and suggested ways individual Australians can shrink their footprint.


  • Shlok A. represented Egypt and gave a speech on Transparency and Confidence -building Measures in Outer Space Activities to the Disarmament and International Security Committee. Shlok stressed the need for a preemptive ban on space weapons and suggested creating satellites with high-powered cameras to detect if there are weapons beyond Earth.


  • Sophia H. represented El Salvador and spoke on Leaving No One Behind to the Economic and Social Committee. She asserted that countries should work together to promote gender equality and reduce discrimination. She also proposed that the government should make more laws to make sure that people have equal rights.


  • Trisha K. represented El Salvador on the Economic and Social Council and addressed Improving Youth Well Being and Mental Health. Trisha spoke on expanding mental health therapy taught by professionals and supported expanding programs that support vulnerable adolescents in El Salvador.


  • Vidit J. represented Egypt and spoke about Leaving No One Behind to the Economic and Social Committee. Vidit recommended that all countries take explicit action to end extreme poverty by donating food, clothes, and money to those in need. Another recommendation was confronting discrimination and encouraging equal education and opportunities for all races and gender by creating laws and programs to provide education for girls and those facing discrimination.


  • Zach C. represented Madagascar to the World Health Organization on Public Health Emergencies Preparedness and Response. Zach stressed the importance of funding programs like UNICEF and making health centers and hospitals available for everyone.


  • Ziva M. represented Rwanda on Ensuring Access to Affordable, Reliable, Sustainable and Modern Energy for All for the Economic and Financial Affairs Council. Ziva outlined that many citizens of Rwanda lack access to electricity and provided ideas to expand access to power and technology as a stepping stone to modern and sustainable energy.


To learn more about Hudson Montessori School’s interdisciplinary, theme-based learning approach to education, the Montessori philosophy and methodology, or how the school fosters the love of learning for children age 2 to fifth grade, sign up for virtual school tour or for more details about our Middle School (6th through 8th grades), attend a Middle School Information Session.






162 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All